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Typo helps catch a man trying to fake his own death



It is under no circumstances advisable to fake your own death, but if you do, it is very important to take the time to proofread your fraudulent death certificate.

That was the lesson learned by 25-year-old Long Island Robert Berger, who tried to convince the authorities by falsifying documents that he was dead. According to CNN, Berger was accused of possessing fourth-degree stolen property in December 2018 and attempted great third-degree theft in June 2019. When he pleaded guilty to both of them, he was expected to be sentenced on October 22, 2019.

But instead of appearing in court, Berger was nowhere to be found. His lawyer Meir Moza claimed that his client had died.

Days later, Moza gave the court a copy of Berger̵

7;s “death certificate”, which was provided by Berger’s fiance. In the certificate, the cause of Berger’s death was listed as suffocation due to suicide. But officials were suspicious of the fact that the word Registration had been misspelled as regsitry three times throughout the document and that different fonts were used.

The prosecutor turned to the New Jersey Department of Health, the Department of Vital Statistics, and the registry to confirm that they actually know how to spell Registration and came to the conclusion that the document was fake.

Moza denied any role in the deception, and the Nassau District Prosecutor’s Office did not accuse him. Berger, on the other hand, has become a topic of great interest. Oddly enough, he has been in prison in Pennsylvania since he was arrested in November 2019 for other allegations of false law enforcement identity. Since then, he has been extradited to Nassau County and now has to pay four years in prison for the new false identity charge filing instrument, which is a crime.

Berger’s current legal problems will require the help of someone other than Moza, who has ended up representing his non-deceased client.

[h/t CNN]




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