Home / Best / Top 10 films better than the best

Top 10 films better than the best




The same films always appear in every list of the greatest films of all time. Sometimes the people who put the lists together saw them.

And of course these are all pretty good films. The first time you see her. And maybe even the second or third. But after that, you're probably ready for a change.

We have put together a list of films that we think are as good, if not a little bit better than those everyone has heard of.

So here are 10 films that are better than the best.

Top 10 Funniest Movies of All Time

10 Prison Movies Better Than Salvation of Shawshank


Shawshank Salvation Is Consistently Chosen The Best Jail Movie and Sometimes The Best Movie Ever, and He deserves some praise. Tim Robbins is the wrongly convicted woman killer who is determined to break free, and Morgan Freeman is the dulled classic car that is learning to live again.

It is heartwarming.

Which is fine if you like your prison movies with extra goose bumps.

A more edgy breakout film is the 1960 film Le Trou (The Hole), a French language escape film in which 4 cellmates spend the entire film digging a tunnel and wondering if the other 3 can be trusted that they don't rat on them.

Spoiler alert: This is not a heartwarming film.

If you prefer something more modern, you can try Snowpiercer. In the near future after a climate change disaster, the last people on Earth will be sitting on a giant train, The Snowpiercer. While the rich enjoy first-class comfort, the poor are locked in the back of the train, which is staffed by armed guards.

Keyword breaks out.

But if you want a prison movie to really scare you Midnight Express is still terrible 40 years after its original release. Brad Davies plays Billy Hayes and the film is based on a true account of Billy's arrest in Istanbul for trying to smuggle hash into America. His experience in a Turkish prison is extremely uncomfortable and the audience is just as grateful as Billy when he finally escapes.

9 War Films Better Than Apocalypse Now


Apocalypse Now is a great war film, no doubt. It not only evokes the "horror" of war, but also the absolute senselessness.

War, what is it good for?

But everyone saw him, and even if he doesn't have it, he knows it. And familiar horror is not that terrible.

A lesser known war film is Letters From Iwo Jima. Both films, made by Clint Eastwood as a companion to Flags of Our Fathers, told the story of the battle of Iwo Jima during World War II from opposite sides.

Letters from Iwo Jima not only show the horror of war, it shows that the men who are actually fighting are pretty much the same on both sides of the no man's land. They are witness to barbarism, incompetence and senseless orders. Their commanders have little idea what they are doing, and the men can only rely on each other.

Honorable mention in the War Films category should go until 1917, Sam Mendes & # 39; report of a single day in the First World War. Not the most important day, not the day the war was won, just a day out of the 1567 days the war lasted. Only time will tell if 1917 is a classic, but the film was certainly alarmingly realistic, and cinematography was groundbreaking in several ways.

8 Noir films better than the Maltese falcon


Film Noir is usually a hard-nosed detective with misanthropic (if not misogynistic) tendencies. Casual violence is a must, as is moody light, and if it's not shot in black and white, much of the action takes place at night.

Noir films don't stop smelling the roses.

They are cynical and dramatic, often melodramatic, but never sentimental.

The Maltese falcon is often cited as a perfect example of noir. It is certainly the best known. Humphrey Bogart plays Sam Spade, the PI, who never smiles, with Mary Astor as his Femme Fatale customer.

Roman Polanski's Chinatown was made 30 years after his hat was hung up by Sam Spade, although it was set up around the same time. Chinatown is not just noir; it is neo noir. Jack Nicholson is the hard-nosed detective and Faye Dunaway the client. It embodies all elements of Noir and has been nominated for 11 Oscars.

A lesser known neo noir that is just as great is The Last Seduction. Linda Fiorentino plays the extremely fat woman, Bill Pullman her estranged and very angry husband. Peter Berg plays the unfortunate fool who has no idea who he is going to bed with. The storyline is twisted, smart, and clever, and the ending is one for noir film women because Fiorentino is deadly.

7 Suspense films better than Vertigo


Vertigo is considered a masterful Suspense film, not only because it is a Hitchcock classic or even because James Stewart is not the calm, respectable, somewhat boring Is american we expect him to be. He is confused by his dizziness and grief and obsession with a woman.

However, the defining feature of the film is the title. The disturbing, nerve-wracking feeling Stewart's character feels when confronted with heights makes the film truly unforgettable.

While Vertigo's vertical camera shots that fall to the floor like a yo-yo and retreat again are certainly enough to do them. The audience feels uncomfortable, The Walk's camera work is positively divided into two.

Especially when you look at the 3-D version.

The film that tells the story of Phillipe Petit's high-wire walk between the Twin Towers may not have a Hitchcock plot, but if you haven't suffered from dizziness before you went to the movies, you're almost certain to get there. Joseph Gordon-Levitt starred as Petit in a film that was hardly noticed when it came out, but definitely deserves a watch.

Just not after eating.

If you are looking for tension that is closer to the ground, A. Quiet Place will have you continuously at the edge of your seat. Often referred to as horror, the film is a miracle to create terror out of silence. No dramatic music is required and there is very little dialogue.

We only know that it is very important to be quiet.

6 Action Adventure Movies Better Than Raiders Of The Lost Ark


Raiders of The Lost Ark is consistently voted the best action adventure movie ever. It certainly seems to have a lot to offer. Not only was it nominated for an Oscar for Best Picture, which is quite a feat for an action film, but it also made a lot of money for Steven Spielberg and Paramount Pictures, no doubt because of its explosive action scenes, exotic locations and sharp comedies. [19659002] And of course there was a man with a whip. What could be better than that?

Well, Kung Fu Hustle, for starters. The film takes place in Shanghai in the 1930s and has an intricate plot. But you don't really have to follow it or read the subtitles. You just have to sit back and enjoy the action sequences and the sophisticated comedy.

Nothing has ever done more to make the harp game look cool than Kung Fu Hustle.

Top 10 Best TV Comedy Series of Lately

5 Disaster Movies Better Than the Titanic


A great disaster movie requires a number of ordinary characters who are faced with extraordinary, not to mention terrible, circumstances are. They deal with both human nature and the natural or unnatural disasters that occur around them. The moral of the disaster movie seems to be if you were an asshole before the disaster struck, nothing will change.

Titanic is the best known and most commercial catastrophe film, but before the king of the world James Cameron At Sea it went in 1974 with The Poseidon Adventure, which pretty much set the standard for catastrophes at sea (Towering Inferno did the same for land disasters for 2 years later). The Poseidon adventure is still worth seeing today, although the special effects are less special than those of the Titanic.

Still, the Poseidon adventure has Gene Hackman, who takes her to safety, and Shelley Winters, who deserves a swimming badge of merit.

If you are looking for something more realistic, you can choose Everest.
Published in 2015, he told the story of the 1996 Everest disaster, which was ironically the worst ever recorded in 2015 when an earthquake at the height of the climbing season caused an avalanche on the mountain.

The film told the true story of two commercial climbing expeditions that led climbing teams to the summit only to be suddenly and overtaken by an extremely violent snowstorm – one of the worst in history that says anything about Nepal.

Unfortunately, unlike The Poseidon Adventure, the good guys didn't always make it in the real catastrophe. However, the cinematography is breathtaking, Jason Clarke, Josh Brolin and Jake Gyllenhaal were brilliant and John Hawkes won the Outstanding Effort badge of merit.

4 Horror films better than the exorcist


The exorcist was only released to a limited extent in cinemas in 1973, but was immediately a hit despite a lukewarm reception by film critics. The success of the film was probably supported by newspaper reports of fainting spells, heart attacks or allegedly even miscarriages as a result of the film. It was also somehow rated R-rated, which meant thousands of children visited it and had nightmares for years.

Five years before the exorcist, however, Rosemary's baby was equally worrying. Directed by Roman Polanski, Mia Farrow played a pregnant woman who instinctively felt that something was wrong with her neighbors.

There is also something wrong with her husband, not least that he seems to need a lesson about informed consent.

But it was fun necrophilically, so that's fine.

Rosemary's baby is about many things. Satanism, paranoia and the fears of a woman who is about to be born. It's also about how far people will go to be polite.

Yes, of course I will eat this funny-tasting pudding. I don't want to offend.

The film becomes more troubling because the Satanists look just like the people next door (which they are natural) and their satanic rituals are very similar to an afternoon tea party.

In the end it is the habit that is terrifying.

Who needs spinner heads?

3 Boxing films better than Rocky


There are many films about sports – soccer and baseball films are perennial and even niche sports like bobsleighing have had their moment in the spotlight of Hollywood. But if there is a sport that illustrates the athlete's spirit, then it fights.

One warrior against another in a ring.

Two men enter, one man leaves.

Well, maybe not quite. While Hollywood boxing matches are usually not fatal, they certainly have a gladiatorial element that cinema audiences really love.

The most famous example is of course Rocky. This is partly because it produced and counts a million sequels, but also because Sylvester Stallone perfectly embodied the boxer with great ambition and few other options in life. And he already had the broken nose and cauliflower ear, which must have saved time when applying make-up.

But there are also other combat films. Take Warrior, for example. Not just boxing, but kickboxing. Warrior is the story of two brothers (Tom Hardy and Joel Edgerton) and their alcoholic father (Nick Nolte). Hardy is a former Navy, while Edgerton is a struggling high school teacher. Both could really use the $ 5 million wallet for the winner of a mixed martial arts tournament. Both men decide to enter, and it is only a matter of time before they face each other in the ring.

If you'd rather stick to the Marquis of Queensbury rules and traditional boxing, Million Dollar Baby has it all. Directed by Clint Eastwood, who is also the indescribable trainer, the film Hilary Swank plays as a boxer.

Same grit, determination, sweat like Rocky, but Hilary Swank is indeed a woman. Million Dollar Baby may not have the triumphant ending of Rocky, but it's still a great film about courage, grit, and the fulfillment of dreams.

2 Western films better than the seekers


The seekers are meant to be a triumph for both his director John Huston and his star John Wayne. The story of a civil war veteran who returns home from the war and soon finds his wife and child dead and kidnaps his nieces from Comanches.

It is a fairly brutal film and the number of bodies is high, but the critical recording for the film was good at that time and its reputation has continued to grow.

One Eyed Jacks, on the other hand, has an undeservedly low reputation. The only film ever made by Marlon Brando, who also starred, is about three bank robbers, one of whom runs away with all their loot and another who runs away, leaving Brando behind to be caught.

After 5 years in prison, Brando himself searches a little. The film received mixed reviews at the time, but like The Searchers, its reputation has grown.

If you just like your westerns a little less brutal, you could try Dead Man. Directed by Jim Jarmusch and with a young Johnny Depp in the title role and Gary Farmer as Nobody.

Dead Man is a slow passage of a western. It's hypnotic, dream quality, and Gary Farmer almost steals the show.

1 Crime films better than the godfather


The godfather (more precisely the godfather 2) is considered the ultimate crime thriller. The Godfather films have the sweeping feel of an epic, with the brutality you would expect from a gangster film.

But let's face it, they're very, very long.

If you don't have 2 hours and 55 minutes, consider Gomorrah (or Gomorrah). Gomorra is still a mafia film and the story of the Camorra in Naples. Based on a non-fiction book about a real mafia family, the film tells 5 interwoven stories of people whose lives are touched by the mafia. Gomorrah is not the story of the wise men and the Don, but the story of those on the periphery – a messenger who sees something he shouldn't see, a tailor who tries to make a living outside of the mafia-controlled thugs. and the little soldiers who dream of being the boss.

Finally, you could try The Departed. With a cast of heavyweight actors including Leonardo DiCaprio, Jack Nicholson, and Matt Damon, it loosely bases on the story of Boston-Irish crime boss Whitey Bulger, a corrupt FBI agent, and two undercover infiltrators who get in each other's way

The film was both a commercial and a critical success and won 4 Oscars, including "Best Film".

Jack Nicholson is at his best as a crime boss and has nothing to lose, who knows we are all on our way out.

Act accordingly.

Top 10 best films from the top genres

About the Author: Ward Hazell is a freelance writer and travel writer and is currently also studying English literature.

We publish lists of our readers! Submit here. . .


Source link