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Top 10 bizarre smells from 18th century England



The majority of people are aware of the less hygienic history of mankind. Between making eyebrows out of the skin of a mouse, a British monarch's belief that a bath would be harmful, the use of lye (a mixture of ash and urine) by the Romans to wash clothes, and the invention of toilet paper in more than 300,000 years ago we were far from a sterile track record.

What most people do not know are the smells associated with such methods of "hygiene". The list below is a collection of delightful flavors from a time that coincided with the romantic, but is nowhere near as charming. Get ready – it's Georgian England.

10 times, nature smelled of something completely unexpected.

The majority of people are aware of the less hygienic history of mankind. Between making eyebrows out of the skin of a mouse, a British monarch's belief that a bath would be harmful, the use of lye (a mixture of ash and urine) by the Romans to wash clothes, and the invention of toilet paper in more than 300,000 years ago we were far from a sterile track record.

What most people do not know are the smells associated with such methods of "hygiene". The list below is a collection of delightful flavors from a time that coincided with the romantic, but is nowhere near as charming. Get ready ̵

1; it's Georgian England.

10 Otto von Rose


The word "perfume" comes from the Latin for "smell through smoking". The first perfumes were used to protect against the plague, since it was believed that diseases could be prevented by "cleaning the air and warding off bad smells". In the second half of the 18th century, Otto von Rose had become the most popular perfume. It was made by heating rose petals and water in a copper jug ​​and then extracting the oil from the mixture.

Due to its popularity, there was a great deal of paranoia about counterfeit perfume among the Georgian English. Following an 1831 guide for staff to search for counterfeit perfume; "Drop a very small Otto on a clean piece of writing paper and hold it against the fire. If the item is genuine, it evaporates without leaving any traces on the paper. Otherwise, the imposition is recognized by a grease stain. “

Otto von Rose's popularity was largely due to the horror of earlier perfumes. Civet was a perfume obtained from a gland near the civet's anus. Apparently, the Georgians felt that carrying substances that were removed from the back of a cat was rather unfriendly.

9 Tobacco


During Georgian England there was a complete explosion of social life. In the 17th century, men often gathered to smoke their pipes in coffeehouses, but in the 18th century tobacco had earned an unsavory connotation. The Georgians believed that women could not tolerate tobacco smoke, which led to allegations that women would leave their husbands if they refused to part with their pipes. Puffing a pipe in public was also considered rude.

As a replacement, the Georgians began to sniff; the snort of finely ground tobacco in the nostril. While this was fashionable, some considered it to be hideous. There were a number of unpleasant side effects that came with it; Cough, grunt and spit. The main advantage was that it didn't penetrate other people's personal space like a blowing cloud of smoke would. Nevertheless, it was reported that the people gathered in the church were annoyed by the noises that sniffed during the Mass!

8 Fisch


The marketplaces in Georgian England were very different from today's supermarkets. There were no standards for food safety, packaging, or expiration dates, so Caveat Emptor ("Let the buyer be careful") applied. Buying food that has gone away can cause illness and insult your house guests. To prevent this, household manuscripts were printed to inform the Georgians how to test their food. Meat and fish were tested by sniffing; If they had a slimy smell, they should be avoided.

Pheasants were examined around the neck to ensure that they had no "foul" smell. Butter also had to be checked before buying, but buyers were warned to bring their own knife for testing because a retailer could simply offer the best piece of the stick.

Billingsgate women selling fish were notorious for being sweaty and angry with their customers. For some it seemed offensive to test their goods. It indicated that they were considered untrustworthy. For this reason, some Georgians would not be dead if they participated in such practices.

7 Color


Although this smell may seem like a rather strange suggestion, the smell of color is mentioned regularly in Georgian diaries. Since the renovation was not frequent, this smell was unforgettable. Georgian colors were made from a mixture of linseed oil and turpentine and therefore had a particularly noticeable and pungent smell.

Bernardino Ramazzini was an Italian doctor who first suggested that the ingredients used in paint manufacture often caused producers to lose their sense of smell. In fact, he was so absorbed in smells that he thought someone should write: "A natural and physical history of smells"!

6 Ammonia


The smell of ammonia is particularly difficult to confuse. The substance itself consists of a combination of hydrogen and nitrogen, which is most common in fermenting urine.

This smell provokes our trigeminal nerve – a type of nerve associated with facial expressions. The Georgians were nervous. A person with sensitive nerves was valued higher in society. Women were thought to be particularly vulnerable to fear. Ammonia was used to revitalize the senses. Georgian novels and dramas even portrayed heroines sniffing corked bottles of ammonia! Georgians later believed that smelling salts could be used to resuscitate people who had drowned or suffocated.

However, ammonia was not the only crazy technique that was tested. One method was to pump a tobacco smoke membrane into the back end. An awkward wake-up call indeed.

10 things you didn't know you could smell

5 marzipan


The industrial revolution took place at the same time as Georgian England. At that time there was massive urbanization. There was an opportunity for city dwellers to buy exotic ingredients and create more sophisticated sweets. Marzipan became a special favorite. Made from almonds, sugar and rose water, they were easy to make and not unaffordable. Marzipan sweets were generally eaten at the end of a meal and had a distinct almond-like smell.

While these were delicious treats, marzipan was also used in sculpture – including the manufacture of people, animals, and castles. A very fashionable model. The creations were left in the middle of the dining table and became a hallmark of the Georgian decoration.

4 wigs


The Georgians may have used marzipan in the sculpture, but the actual work of art was made with Georgian wigs. Hair was stacked on upholstery and wire structures to create intricate masterpieces for the salon. For most, just using their own hair wasn't enough, and so it was infused with horse hair. 1760s styles including an egg shape, but later extended to a classic stool.

The Duchess of Devonshire became famous for her extravagant buffalo when she built a three-foot tall hair tower that contained stuffed birds, waxed fruits, and even model ships. These models were incredibly expensive to manufacture and were therefore worn for weeks without cleaning. Creepy crawling animals inevitably came to the nest and Georgian women developed a scraper bar to ward off the pitter-patter of their miniature tenants.

3 Body odor


The situations in which Georgians lived were not easily consistent with cleanliness. Despite their glamorous appearance, people were extremely dirty. Hands and faces were doused daily, but a thorough, thorough wash was considered harmful. The clothes worn by women caused special problems.

Because of their heavy material, they made the wearer sweat excessively. There were no deodorants and the resulting stench was terrible. In addition, the clothes themselves were only washed once a month. Garments were washed and changed more often. But they were cleaned with lye – the same ash-urine mixture that the Romans used. Nobel.

2 Bad breath


The Georgians also tended to carry a wave of rotting teeth around. Cleaning tooth powder was started to be used, but these contained sulfuric acid, which removed the enamel from the teeth. The best way to ward off more stench was to use herbs or parsley. If a tooth became a lost thing, it was pulled out of the gum with pliers. Of course, no anesthetics.

To prevent them from getting a rubbery smile, they looked for a replacement for porcelain. Wherever possible, they preferred to buy live prostheses. The poor often sold their teeth to support the market – a viable business proposition for those who tend to.

1 Body fluids


The unsolved secret of hygiene among Georgian women has confused countless historians. Since they had no panties to protect them, they were forced to rely on Mother Nature, or so it seems. What is more proven is their toilet habits.

Ladies at the royal court relied on a china jug to do their business, a device called Bourdaloue. It was clenched between her thighs under her skirt. It was not uncommon for a woman to continue talking to others while urinating!

These ten different scents are indeed repulsive. Unfortunately, some of them have prevailed in history. While fragrant wigs are usually less common these days, body odors are still clearly present, as is bad breath. The difference is that showers and deodorants are common in many countries today. The fact that these smells can still be smelled shows how disgusting we really are.

Top 10 Unbelievable Smells That Will Blow You Away

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